Skip to main content

"Lord, How Oft Shall My Brother Sin against Me, and I Forgive Him?"

Matthew 18:21-35


There is an underlying truth with this particular passage's core message that resonates with me. The Savior expresses it here in as many words as well:
...I forgave thee all that debt, because thou desiredst me:
Shouldest not thou also have had compassion on thy fellowservant, even as I had pity on thee?
I find myself at that "Mercy Seat" perhaps more often than I should be. Without exception, when ever I have approached the Lord for forgiveness, freely He has extended his love and peace and compassion to me, a sinner. With this knowledge of how willingly and freely my Lord has exercised his grace and goodness towards me, who am entirely unworthy of such compassionate patience, I find it hard to respond otherwise to those around me with anything less.

Though,  ironically, it is with family members closest to me that this personal attribute is most frequently tried and tested, and sometime that is difficult to remember.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Let Your Light So Shine," Matthew 5:3-16

Matthew 5:3-16

These verses are ringing out in my ears this morning as a cry for repentance.

Alma 60:23 - "...Remember that God has said that the inward vessel shall be cleansed first, and then shall the outer vessel be cleansed also."

Revisiting these brief statements of hope, I paused on "Blessed are they that mourn, for they shall be comforted." The Savior doesn't offer much explanation on how this would happen or why or anything of the sort. But then I cross referenced footnotes until I arrived at Isaiah 60:20. I went back and read the entire chapter. Doing so, it becomes clearly evident that those who ever had cause to mourn, will -- in some great future day-- never have cause to mourn again.

Understanding this also gives pause to lessen the pains of present challenges.

--------

This brings us to consider one of the great oxymorons of  Christ's teachings:
"Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father…

"A Sower Went Forth to Sow," Matthew 13:1-23

Matthew 13:1-23

The parable of the sower as taught in these verses I feel is fairly well known. What follows the Savior's initial instructions however is notably decisive in explaining the difference between the true disciples of Christ, and those who will casually pass by to listen, but with no intent to act on what is heard.

There is much to study here, but what is curious about this passage is that I find there are distinct parallels between these fundamental teachings of Christ, and in the early recorded scriptural documents in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

For example, compare Matthew 13:11 with Doctrine and Covenants 6:11-12

A House Divided, Luke 11:14-26; Matthew 12:31-42

Luke 11:14-26; Matthew 12:31-42 (see also Luke 12:9-10)

There is a passage here that discusses blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, and thanks to a Joseph Smith translation, I now understand the connection between that topic and the passages that discuss the effects of an unclean spirit going and coming from a man's house.

So here is the doctrine--

Christ in several different places talks of the comparison between blasphemy against himself as compared with blasphemy against the Holy Ghost. For example:
Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.
And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come. (Matthew 12:31-32) The Joseph Smith Translation on Luke 12, also clearly states the difference between blasphemy aga…